Science Technology and Reparations

Regular price £365.00

Science Technology and Reparations

By John Gimbel

PRE-OWNED COPY. The author describes the manner in which German scientific and technical research, including private commercial trade secrets protected by international patent law and worth billions, was simply stolen and sold or given to private American companies for risible sums of money.

A single paragraph in a single German document was said to have been worth 100,000 dollars to one American company. The scope of the plunder is such that one is almost left with the impression that the Americans actually provoked the war just to indulge in international thievery on a gigantic scale.

The following are a few paragraphs from the book, pp. 22-23:

“Howland H. Sargeant, the chairman of the wartime THC, the agency that collected both written and oral reports from investigators upon their return from Europe after the war, testified before a committee of Congress early in February 1946 that our top people in Germany had discovered and brought back technical know-how on a cold steel extrusion process used by the Germans to produce shell fuses at the rate of about twenty or thirty per minute, while Americans produced similar fuses at a rate of about one every three minutes.

Such ‘processes carry over directly’ to peacetime production, Sergeant observed. Noting that the United States had some 600 sheet-stamping shops and more than 2,500 manufacturing shops that stamped materials out of sheet metal, he concluded that all of these could use this process to produce more economically and efficiently, and to manufacture ‘far more intricate parts than ever before’.

“Variations of the rubber story and the cold-steel extrusion theme could be repeated for synthetic fuel, jet aircraft, rockets, infrared, aerial photography, optical glass, electron microscopes, power circuit-breakers, die-casting equipment, wind tunnels, acetylene chemistry, textiles and textile machinery, X-ray tubes, forest products, ceramics, colors and dyes, tape recorders, heavy presses, diesel motors, high-tension cables, radio condensers, insecticides, color film processing, a unique chocolate-wrapping machine, a continuous butter-making machine, a precision grinding machine, a “hot welding” process for making radiator cores, and other technologies.

Wind tunnels found in Germany were reported to be ‘far superior’ to anything in use in the United States, and a working model on a twin-engine diesel motor was judged to be ‘far superior to anything that had been produced or planned in the States’. ‘An ingenious German machine’ for producing radio condensers was thought to be advanced enough to ‘revolutionize the manufacture of condensers for radio, radar, and other electric and electronic equipment’. Textile industry technicians, one of whom reportedly said ‘we have been asleep here’, found German ‘textiles and yarns with no commercial counterpart in this country’ and ‘equipment for spinning worsted yarns ‘superior to ours’.

Finally, Army Signal Corps experts and ‘many manufacturers and designers of electrical equipment in this country’ judged German die-casting machines – which the Germans had used to produce bomb parts, fuses, radio and field telephone sets, field glasses, camera parts, and ‘complete radio chassis of excellent design’ to be ‘a real advance in the die casting art’".

This book is discussed in a letter to Ernst Zundel, and you can read it on this link: www.cwporter.com/letter34.htm

See also the Original CIOS Report Documents (Combined Intelligence Operations Service) offered here which evidence the claims made in the book